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  1. Web Design
Webdesign

Web Design Learning Guides

Learn some essential new web design skills with these learning guides. Each one has been specially designed to help you master an important topic, like web accessibility or using Figma for web design.

If you have questions about a web design concept or framework, these learning guides will answer them. The guide to Vue.js, for example, gives a concise explanation of what Vue is and how it works, while linking out to more in-depth tutorials and courses to help you learn more. You can find similar guides for Adobe XD, Foundation, and much more.

  1. AJAX for Front-End Designers

    4 Posts
    This series aims to familiarize front-end designers and newbie developers with AJAX, an essential front-end technique. Loading content “asynchronously” is helpful for keeping the initial weight of a page low, instead presenting certain information only when the user specifically asks for it. 
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  2. Building a Mini, API-Driven Web App

    4 Posts
    During this short series, follow Jim Nielsen as he builds a simple web app based on the iTunes API. The app built during this series has a very specific use, but the principles and practical examples covered will arm you with a set of skills you can apply to many other projects.
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  3. Bootstrap 3 Succinctly

    9 Posts
    Bootstrap 3, arguably the most popular front-end framework available today, brought with it some significant changes from version 2. We recently had the opportunity to collaborate with Syncfusion to offer you one of their popular eBooks, Bootstrap 3 Succinctly, as a Learning Guide. Follow along as Peter Shaw takes you through the most important differences, introduces new features, and gives you a firm understanding of how Bootstrap 3 works.
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  4. Strange and Unusual HTML

    18 Posts
    In your day-to-day HTML coding you'll undoubtedly use <div> elements, hopefully even <section>, <aside> and <article> tags where more appropriate. You'll describe semantic relationships between headings using <h1> through to <h6>. Your form inputs are probably of the correct type, dictating whether entered data should be a valid email address, or number - but there are loads of obscure HTML tags and attributes which you might not be familiar with. Some are simple, others are still in development and the occasional one is just downright weird! This collection of tutorials and quick tips will get you up to speed with some of the more unusual HTML tags.
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